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The question has captivated much of official Washington as lawmakers await Christine Blasey Ford’s decision on testifying in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Committee Chairman Charles E. Grassley offered Ford the chance to speak publicly about her allegations that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her at a party some 35 years ago…

“A lot of the  things she says seem very believable. But every single story has gaps in it—sometimes you win or lose based on how you handle those gaps,” Jennifer Loven, the managing director of Glover Park Group, told me.

Loven has prepped scores of clients for congressional hearings—from low-profile, private citizens to major CEOs—but said, ultimately, the risks will be weighed by the client alone. “It’s such a personal decision. Every woman who has a story to tell, assuming she’s credible and telling the truth, weighs just an incredible number of factors … Really only she can decide whether she has an obligation to herself, to society, before going before members of Congress.”

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